Showing: 11 - 20 of 33 RESULTS
Does Sense of Coherence Buffer the Relationship Between Emotional Labor and Burnout in Corrections Officers?

Does Sense of Coherence Buffer the Relationship Between Emotional Labor and Burnout in Corrections Officers?

This study explores how the stressful environment of working in a prison, particularly in regard to the need to manage emotions (emotional labor), and personal resources (in the form of personal sense of coherence) affect occupational burnout. Using data from a sample of 169 correctional staff members who participated in an ongoing study of health and well-being among staff at state correctional facilities, we examine whether work-based emotional labor is related to the emotional exhaustion component of burnout, and whether personal sense of coherence (SOC) has a protective effect by buffering the impact of emotional labor on burnout-exhaustion.

Impact of Surface Acting Emotional Labor on Depression in Healthcare Workers: The Role of Emotional Exhaustion as a Mediator

Impact of Surface Acting Emotional Labor on Depression in Healthcare Workers: The Role of Emotional Exhaustion as a Mediator

In this study conducted in a mixed population of non-clinical and clinical healthcare staff, we examined the association of depression with preventable work environment factors using a novel mediation analysis approach. We found that emotional labor (SaEL), emotional exhaustion, job strain, and work family interference were positively associated with depression while perceived organizational support for safety and work role functioning were negatively associated. The association between emotional labor and depression was strongly mediated through emotional exhaustion. These findings suggest that interventions regarding SaEL are needed for HCWs in order to reduce emotional exhaustion and consequently decrease the risk of depression. Further longitudinal studies are needed to verify these associations.

Nutrition and Exercise Barriers and Facilitators in the Workplace and their Effects on Daily Health Behaviors, Performance, and Well-Being

Nutrition and Exercise Barriers and Facilitators in the Workplace and their Effects on Daily Health Behaviors, Performance, and Well-Being

This study used a daily diary approach to survey employees in a variety of organizations for a total of 5 days on their barriers and facilitators to nutrition and exercise behaviors, as well as several health choice and work-related outcomes. It found that the number of barriers and facilitators reported on a given day were related to the specific health behaviors of diet and exercise, and that some types of barriers/facilitators did also relate work performance, well-being, and stress. This has implications for how organizations can promote healthy eating and exercise choices for employees that wish to make these choices by removing the barriers in their work environment and create factors that facilitate them.

Emotional exhaustion in healthcare workers: The importance of organizational leadership and safety

Emotional exhaustion in healthcare workers: The importance of organizational leadership and safety

In this study conducted in a mixed population of non-clinical and clinical healthcare staff, we examined the association of emotional exhaustion-a dimension of burnout-with understudied work environment exposures including organizational-level policies and practices as well as job-level hazardous work conditions, using a novel mediation analysis approach proposed by Valerie and VanderWeele. We found that job safety, emotional labor, psychological demands, physical demands, job strain, assault and negative acts (bullying) were positively associated with emotional exhaustion while organizational support for safety was negatively associated. Job hazards served as both mediator and moderator in the association between organizational support for safety and emotional exhaustion. These findings suggest that policies for organizational commitment to employee safety should be efficiently applied to ensure reduction of job hazards in order to improve burnout. Future longitudinal studies are needed to further examine this association.

Autistic employees’ experiences in the office environment and suggestions for improvement: A qualitative reflexive thematic analysis.

Autistic employees’ experiences in the office environment and suggestions for improvement: A qualitative reflexive thematic analysis.

Informed by person-environment fit theory, this study qualitatively investigated the experiences of autistic employees in the office environment in relation to their well-being and job attitudes. A total of 100 autistic employees of varied industries and countries participated in this survey, and the data were analyzed using reflexive thematic analysis, albeit the analyses are at present incomplete. The themes identified by this study can inform measures employers take to increase autistic employee fit in the office.

Assessing attitude toward workplace inclusivity: Development of a measure and preliminary validation evidence

Assessing attitude toward workplace inclusivity: Development of a measure and preliminary validation evidence

This study describes the initial development of a measure designed to assess attitude toward the inclusion of minority groups in the workplace. Following conceptual definition, we constructed affective, cognitive, behavioral, and motivational items; incorporated construct measures of diversity perspectives and hiring attitudes, multicultural identity, social dominance, and perceived organizational discrimination; and digitally administered to a sample of N = 210 employed respondents. Exploratory factor analysis identified four meaningful dimensions that attitude toward inclusivity that we labeled inclusive action, normative beliefs, aversive affect, and inclusive participation. Relations with external validity constructs and implications for organizations are reported.

How Others Perceive Our Competence Matters: An Examination of Working Cancer Survivors’ Work Engagement and Turnover Intention

How Others Perceive Our Competence Matters: An Examination of Working Cancer Survivors’ Work Engagement and Turnover Intention

Working cancer survivors can face stereotypes and discrimination at work. Our research focused on cancer survivors’ perceptions about whether they are seen as competent or not in the workplace. Survey data from 200 working cancer survivors indicated that when survivors perceived that others at work see them as competent, they developed higher self-efficacy, which was then related to higher work engagement and lower turnover intention. Cancer survivors’ need for emotional support served as a boundary condition.

Understaffing and Turnover Among Nurses

Understaffing and Turnover Among Nurses

Due to an ongoing nursing shortage within the United States, there are numerous healthcare facilities that understaffed, in which understaffed work environments have numerous consequences for both nurses and patients. The purpose of this study is to examine burnout as a linking mechanism between perceptions of understaffing and both occupational and organizational turnover intentions among nurses. Further, forms of support (organizational support and coworker support) are examined as potential buffers for the relationship between understaffing and burnout. The study sample consists of 365 full-time nurses, simple mediation analyses will be conducted to determine if burnout is the linking mechanism between understaffing and both forms of turnover intentions, and moderated mediation analyses will be conducted to determine if organizational and/or coworker support buffer the relationship between understaffing and burnout.

Social Support Buffering During a Traumatic Extraorganizational Stressor: The Relationship Between Supervisor Support, COVID-19 Related Fear, and Mental Health

Social Support Buffering During a Traumatic Extraorganizational Stressor: The Relationship Between Supervisor Support, COVID-19 Related Fear, and Mental Health

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic represents a significant traumatic extraorganizational stressor for employees around the world. Experiences of fear, loss, and uncertainty have become more common during the pandemic, potentially leading to diminished mental health and other adverse organizational outcomes. Using survey data from approximately 1000 Canadian and American employees, responding to the same survey at three time points four weeks apart, this study investigates the role of supervisor support in buffering the relationship between employees? emotional responses to extraorganizational stressors (specifically COVID-19 related fear) and mental health. By examining the impact supervisors may have on their employees? mental health during times of instability, this study identifies a possible strategy for protecting employee?s mental health and informs future organizational preparedness to traumatic extraorganizational stressors.

Occupational Health Impact of COVID-19 Response on Nurses’ Stress and Well-being in Hospital Setting

Occupational Health Impact of COVID-19 Response on Nurses’ Stress and Well-being in Hospital Setting

This study examined COVID-19 and personal factors associated with the health and well-being of 314 US nurses in hospital setting, during a heightened wave of the pandemic. A significant percentage of nurses reported high level of stressors associated with COVID-19 experience at work and in their personal lives, significant COVID-19 related anxiety, depression, and high levels of burnout. Nurses with children at home, caring for COVID-19 patients, with higher workload and less seniority, reported worse mental health and well-being outcomes. The results indicate the need for interventions to support nurses during and post-pandemic.