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NIOSH Chronic Disease Prevention Program: Expanding Partnerships to Prevent Occupational Disease

NIOSH Chronic Disease Prevention Program: Expanding Partnerships to Prevent Occupational Disease

This presentation provides information on the mission and function of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health?s (NIOSH?s) Cancer, Reproductive, Cardiovascular and Other Chronic Disease Prevention Program (CRC). The poster will describe current research priorities related to reducing and preventing occupational chronic diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, renal diseases, and neurological diseases as well as adverse reproductive outcomes. Collaboration with researchers, labor unions, professional and trade associations, and others is critical to the CRC and this poster will help to promote partnerships external to NIOSH.

Are Prosocial Job Characteristics For Everyone? The Job Impact Framework, Personality, and Emotional Labor

Are Prosocial Job Characteristics For Everyone? The Job Impact Framework, Personality, and Emotional Labor

This study examined the moderating relationships of prosocial personality, extroversion, and emotional labor on prosocial job characteristics (PSJC) and burnout and work-related negative affect. Extroversion moderated the relationship between PSJC and burnout. Contrary to hypotheses, PSJC were associated with negative affect, and low levels of deep acting buffered the relationship. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to consider detrimental outcomes from the job impact framework.

The relationship between call volume and daily changes in negative emotions in 911 telecommunicators

The relationship between call volume and daily changes in negative emotions in 911 telecommunicators

The study employed a prospective, intensive longitudinal design to examine whether 911 telecommunicators who take more dispatched calls have more intense negative emotions from pre to post-shift, as compared to 911 telecommunicators who take fewer dispatched calls. Participants (n = 48 telecommunicators) completed visual analogue scale ratings of negative emotions before and after their shift over one week. A higher-than-usual daily 911 call volume was associated with greater post-shift irritability, when controlling for pre-shift irritability and shift length.

Workplace Telepressure and Employee Performance – Are There Any Benefits That Offset Well-Being Costs?

Workplace Telepressure and Employee Performance – Are There Any Benefits That Offset Well-Being Costs?

This study explored whether the urge to respond to work-based messages rapidly (i.e., workplace telepressure) is related to different self-reported performance behaviors in addition to employee well-being, and whether low workload alters the effects of workplace telepressure on performance and well-being. The results suggest that workplace telepressure had well-being costs (work fatigue, sleep problems, and poor satisfaction with work-life balance) with mixed benefits to performance. (organizational citizenship only). Telepressure was unrelated to in-role performance behavior, but predicted higher levels of both organizational citizenship behavior and counterproductive work behavior. The effects of workplace telepressure on performance and well-being outcomes did not change based on employee levels of workload, although the links between telepressure and some outcomes (satisfaction with work-life balance and counterproductive work behavior) were nonsignificant when accounting for workload in the predictive model.

Immediate and Retrospective Characterizations of Stress in Nursing Incivility and Harassment Experiences

Immediate and Retrospective Characterizations of Stress in Nursing Incivility and Harassment Experiences

This study will provide a description of the nature and distribution of incivility experiences and aggressive/hostile incidents experienced by nurses during the course of a work week. Quantitative and qualitative data from close-in-time incident reports and end-of-day daily experience surveys are used to characterize the frequency, characteristics and sources of incivility and aggression as well as the nature of incidents that comprise the experiences reported during the study period.

Job Insecurity and the Moderating Role of Economic Dependence and Job Satisfaction: What Happens When You Really Need or Love Your Job?

Job Insecurity and the Moderating Role of Economic Dependence and Job Satisfaction: What Happens When You Really Need or Love Your Job?

Researchers have consistently found that job insecurity is related to a number of poor health and well-being outcomes. Despite this, the extent to which this relationship may be moderated by job satisfaction or financial dependence on the job has not been sufficiently investigated. Our study found support for the moderating role of economic dependence and job satisfaction in the relationship between job insecurity and life satisfaction. In addition, we also found that economic dependence moderates the relationship between job insecurity and self-rated health.

Understanding Work-Related Stress among Medicolegal Death Professionals: Results of a Thematic Qualitative Analysis

Understanding Work-Related Stress among Medicolegal Death Professionals: Results of a Thematic Qualitative Analysis

Medicolegal death investigators (MDIs) are routinely exposed to stressful and traumatic events, which impacts their own wellbeing and their ability to efficiently complete their investigations, collaborate within the criminal justice system, and interact with families of decedents. Yet relatively little is known about how stress and trauma impact these professionals and how to improve their wellbeing. We conducted a national survey of MDIs to address this gap; this poster focuses on the findings of a qualitative analysis of responses to an open-ended question on this survey. Results highlight the impact of organizational stressors (e.g., lack of management support, inadequate pay and resources); implications for research and practice are discussed.

The price of pain: Pain as an explanatory mechanism for the relationship between physical job demands and intentions to turnover

The price of pain: Pain as an explanatory mechanism for the relationship between physical job demands and intentions to turnover

Our presentation conceptualizes pain as an explanatory mechanism for the relationship between physical job demands and intentions to turnover (ITO), using the fear-avoidance (FA) model as the theoretical framework. Data from a multi-wave study on work capacity and aging, which included 360 participants recruited from five manufacturing organizations in the northeastern U.S., were analyzed using the SPSS PROCESS macro (model 4) to estimate direct and indirect effects, while controlling for various covariates. Our results indicated that high physical job demands were significantly related to increased perceptions of pain; high perceptions of pain and high physical job demands were significantly related to higher ITO; and the relationship between physical job demands and ITO was partially mediated by perceptions of pain. Collectively, these results indicate that ITO is a potential outcome of physical job demands, and that pain may partially explain this relationship. As such, in order to reduce instances of ITO, research as well as organizations that require employees to engage in physically demanding work should focus on uncovering interventions that may reduce an employee?s associated experience of pain.

Moderating impact of resources on the relationship between covid demands and Burnout in Emergency Department Health-Care Workers

Moderating impact of resources on the relationship between covid demands and Burnout in Emergency Department Health-Care Workers

Burnout has been a major concern for all workers, but may be particularly concerning and prevalent for healthcare workers. Therefore, we examined healthcare workers before and during the Covid-19 pandemic in order to understand the extent to which the resources that workers had prior to the pandemic would help to buffer the negative impact of Covid stressors on worker health outcomes.

Paradoxical Outcomes of Workplace Mistreatment: A Review

Paradoxical Outcomes of Workplace Mistreatment: A Review

The workplace mistreatment literature commonly finds evidence of an array of negative individual and organizational outcomes due to mistreatment incidents (Schilpzand et al., 2016). However, the literature fails to prominently address the occasions in which certain forms of workplace mistreatment may be paradoxically beneficial to the target employee or organization. This poster presents a qualitative review of the workplace mistreatment literature, focused on summarizing findings from empirical studies that either indicate the processes through which workplace mistreatment leads to paradoxically positive outcomes or the circumstances under which they occur. This review highlights this gap in the literature by directly examining which individual, organizational, and other environmental factors qualify the relationships between workplace mistreatment and desirable outcomes.