Showing: 1 - 10 of 92 RESULTS
Uncovering the sources and impacts of fatigue for onshore oil and gas extraction workers

Uncovering the sources and impacts of fatigue for onshore oil and gas extraction workers

To better understand motor vehicle injuries and associated risk factors in the U.S. onshore oil and gas extraction (OGE) industry, NIOSH researchers set out to survey 500 OGE workers. Survey respondents reported extreme daily commutes, long work hours, and limited sleep all of which were significantly associated with risky driving behaviors and poor driving safety outcomes. The NIOSH researchers are initiating a new research study to identify and describe fatigue in this workforce. The goal of this project is to produce baseline estimates of fatigue for onshore OGE workers, develop initial guidance to employers about the types of work tasks, work schedules, and determine operational environments that should be targeted for fatigue-related interventions.

Stigma and sources of help-seeking for mental health challenges among firefighters

Stigma and sources of help-seeking for mental health challenges among firefighters

The purpose of the current study was to investigate how stigma related to sources of help-seeking among firefighters. Over 2,000 firefighters across the United States and Canada completed an anonymous online survey including questions about stigma regarding mental health care and sources of help-seeking. Firefighters who reported stigma would prevent them from using behavioral health services were less likely to report that they would seek help from Department or Union EAP/MAP services, coworkers, and officers.

New venture launch: The impacts of relationship quality and spousal commitment

New venture launch: The impacts of relationship quality and spousal commitment

The study purpose is to examine individual and relational contributions to an entrepreneur?s perception of their spouse?s commitment to a new business venture one year after its creation. Hobfoll?s Conservation of Resources theory of stress was the theoretical grounding for the study of 73 entrepreneurs and their spouses. Whether a spouse was involved in the new venture prior to its launching, whether the spouse perceived the new venture to be a positive influence on their couple relationship, and an entrepreneur?s positive global affect one year after the launch predicted the entrepreneur?s perception of spousal commitment to the new venture one year after its launch. Spousal involvement had the strongest influence on entrepreneur?s perception of spousal commitment followed by spousal expectation of the business on their couple relationship and entrepreneur?s global affect.

Toward understanding how menopausal symptoms affects work-related stress. A cross-sectional study in a sample of women, administrative employees.

Toward understanding how menopausal symptoms affects work-related stress. A cross-sectional study in a sample of women, administrative employees.

The increasing presence of employed women undergoing menopause has stimulated a growing corpus of research highlighting the complex relationship between menopause and work. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the mechanism by which menopause affects work ability and work-related well-being. In order to fill this gap in the literature, the present study examined whether and how menopausal symptoms affect the relationship between job demands, work ability, and exhaustion. In total, 1,069 menopausal women employed as administrative officers in a public organization filled out a self-report questionnaire. A moderated mediation analysis was carried out using latent moderated structural (LMS) equation. The findings of this analysis indicated that the indirect effect of work ability on the relationship between job demands and exhaustion is influenced by the exacerbating effect of menopausal symptoms on the relationship between job demands and work ability. Moreover, the conditional effect confirmed that women with high menopausal symptoms receive more exposure to the negative effects of job demands on work ability compared to women with low menopausal symptoms. The present findings may help in addressing interventions to prevent negative outcomes for menopausal women and their organizations.

NIOSH Chronic Disease Prevention Program: Expanding Partnerships to Prevent Occupational Disease

NIOSH Chronic Disease Prevention Program: Expanding Partnerships to Prevent Occupational Disease

This presentation provides information on the mission and function of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health?s (NIOSH?s) Cancer, Reproductive, Cardiovascular and Other Chronic Disease Prevention Program (CRC). The poster will describe current research priorities related to reducing and preventing occupational chronic diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, renal diseases, and neurological diseases as well as adverse reproductive outcomes. Collaboration with researchers, labor unions, professional and trade associations, and others is critical to the CRC and this poster will help to promote partnerships external to NIOSH.

NIOSH Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing Program: Work, Stress, and Health

NIOSH Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing Program: Work, Stress, and Health

The NIOSH Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing Program (AgFF) provides leadership and coordination between intra- and extramural efforts nationwide to prevent work-related injuries and illnesses among the nation?s agricultural, forestry, and fishing workers (AgFF). AgFF workers are exposed to high-risk, unpredictable environments, as well as long hours and shift work. Likewise, the majority of AgFF workers are in non-standard work arrangements, and unlike many sectors, most AgFF workers are specifically exempted in many regulatory policies regarding minimum wage, overtime, maximum hours per shift, child labor, and health and safety enforcement. This poster will highlight the NIOSH AgFF Program?s recent and future research, training, and outreach initiatives related to mental health and stress, sleep deprivation and fatigue, aging, workplace violence, non-standard work arrangements, and health equity in order to improve the overall health of all AgFF workers.

Continuous multimodal assessment of physiological stress responses among nurses in relation to incidents of workplace violence: A feasibility study guided by Total Worker Health principles

Continuous multimodal assessment of physiological stress responses among nurses in relation to incidents of workplace violence: A feasibility study guided by Total Worker Health principles

A primary objective of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility of a protocol for detailed and continuous assessment of physiological signals among nurses using a wearable physiological sensor system along with event-contingent experience sampling of critical incidents. Twelve registered nurses (N=12) in a university hospital emergency department wore noninvasive wearable sensors continuously for seven consecutive days and logged the occurrence of workplace violence incidents. The ability to objectively quantify stress responses over the course of the workday could serve as a valuable tool in planning Total Worker Health? interventions.

The Effects of Chronic Thought Suppression on Post-Traumatic Stress Symptom Severity in Firefighters

The Effects of Chronic Thought Suppression on Post-Traumatic Stress Symptom Severity in Firefighters

Firefighter recruits through their first three years of service completed surveys measuring levels of thought suppression, PTSD symptoms, and exposure to potentially traumatic events. A secondary data analysis was conducted, and structural equation modeling revealed that, when controlling for trauma exposure, trait thought suppression correlated significantly with PTSD symptom severity. These results emphasize the importance of considering an individual’s tendency towards thought suppression as a complicating factor of firefighter PTSD severity.

Work-Nonwork Interface and Health Behaviors

Work-Nonwork Interface and Health Behaviors

In keeping with the calls to expand both types of life domain conflict and health behaviors examined, the current study examined the relationship between work-family-school conflict and participation in multiple health behaviors among employed students, and the moderating effects of individual-level traits and organizational characteristics. Using a daily diary design with self-report surveys and objective actigraph data, we found work-family-school conflict was associated with participation in multiple health behaviors on the daily level. Individual traits, such as time management skills, proactive personality, and coping, moderated the relationships between work-family-school conflict and both exercise and sleep. Organizational characteristics, such as workplace health climate, family supportive supervisor behaviors, moderated the relationship between work-family-school conflict and exercise. The current study provides theoretical and practical implications, and allows the groundwork for future intervention-based research.

Later chronotype is associated with poor self-rated health among Japanese daytime employees: a cross-sectional epidemiologic study

Later chronotype is associated with poor self-rated health among Japanese daytime employees: a cross-sectional epidemiologic study

Chronotype, which is the natural inclination or preference of your body to sleep at a certain time, has been implicated to be associated with various health issues including sleep problems and depression. In this study, we have specifically focused on self-rated health and its association with chronotype. As a result, later chronotype was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of poor self-rated health.