Showing: 11 - 20 of 23 RESULTS
Increasing Safety of Construction Workers Through Robots: An Organizational Change Management Perspective

Increasing Safety of Construction Workers Through Robots: An Organizational Change Management Perspective

The construction industry is slow to reform and change is often met with many barriers, even if the change includes clear safety advantages and potentially lifesaving measures (Fernie et al., 2006). Our research aims to develop a deeper understanding of (1) frontline workers? preparedness to work effectively and efficiently with robots on future construction sites and (2) the barriers and facilitators that organizational leadership has identified through their experiences on the construction site. To develop a deeper understanding of the specific challenges faced by the industry, we will hold interviews with a minimum of 20 frontline workers and members of organizational leadership. Data collection is underway and set to complete over the summer.

The price of pain: Pain as an explanatory mechanism for the relationship between physical job demands and intentions to turnover

The price of pain: Pain as an explanatory mechanism for the relationship between physical job demands and intentions to turnover

Our presentation conceptualizes pain as an explanatory mechanism for the relationship between physical job demands and intentions to turnover (ITO), using the fear-avoidance (FA) model as the theoretical framework. Data from a multi-wave study on work capacity and aging, which included 360 participants recruited from five manufacturing organizations in the northeastern U.S., were analyzed using the SPSS PROCESS macro (model 4) to estimate direct and indirect effects, while controlling for various covariates. Our results indicated that high physical job demands were significantly related to increased perceptions of pain; high perceptions of pain and high physical job demands were significantly related to higher ITO; and the relationship between physical job demands and ITO was partially mediated by perceptions of pain. Collectively, these results indicate that ITO is a potential outcome of physical job demands, and that pain may partially explain this relationship. As such, in order to reduce instances of ITO, research as well as organizations that require employees to engage in physically demanding work should focus on uncovering interventions that may reduce an employee?s associated experience of pain.

Emotional exhaustion in healthcare workers: The importance of organizational leadership and safety

Emotional exhaustion in healthcare workers: The importance of organizational leadership and safety

In this study conducted in a mixed population of non-clinical and clinical healthcare staff, we examined the association of emotional exhaustion-a dimension of burnout-with understudied work environment exposures including organizational-level policies and practices as well as job-level hazardous work conditions, using a novel mediation analysis approach proposed by Valerie and VanderWeele. We found that job safety, emotional labor, psychological demands, physical demands, job strain, assault and negative acts (bullying) were positively associated with emotional exhaustion while organizational support for safety was negatively associated. Job hazards served as both mediator and moderator in the association between organizational support for safety and emotional exhaustion. These findings suggest that policies for organizational commitment to employee safety should be efficiently applied to ensure reduction of job hazards in order to improve burnout. Future longitudinal studies are needed to further examine this association.

Occupational Health Impact of COVID-19 Response on Nurses’ Stress and Well-being in Hospital Setting

Occupational Health Impact of COVID-19 Response on Nurses’ Stress and Well-being in Hospital Setting

This study examined COVID-19 and personal factors associated with the health and well-being of 314 US nurses in hospital setting, during a heightened wave of the pandemic. A significant percentage of nurses reported high level of stressors associated with COVID-19 experience at work and in their personal lives, significant COVID-19 related anxiety, depression, and high levels of burnout. Nurses with children at home, caring for COVID-19 patients, with higher workload and less seniority, reported worse mental health and well-being outcomes. The results indicate the need for interventions to support nurses during and post-pandemic.

Longitudinal Trends in Musculoskeletal Health, Chronic Pain, and Occupational Factors Among correctional Officers.

Longitudinal Trends in Musculoskeletal Health, Chronic Pain, and Occupational Factors Among correctional Officers.

This study investigates the trend of musculoskeletal health, chronic pain, violence/assault exposures, physical and psychosocial work factors, and individual health of Correctional Officers. A group of 120 correctional officers from two facilities were followed at two time points with self-reported survey and physical assessments. We will examine the changes in musculoskeletal health and physical and psychosocial work exposures overtime.

Owning Workplace Safety: Investigating the Influence of Safety Locus of Control on Employee Safety Behaviors and Outcomes

Owning Workplace Safety: Investigating the Influence of Safety Locus of Control on Employee Safety Behaviors and Outcomes

This research seeks to understand how individual differences contribute to the prediction of safety behaviors and outcomes by investigating safety locus of control (SLOC), a safety-specific individual difference capturing one?s tendency to view a contingent relationship between employee behavior and safety outcomes. To meet this aim, we developed a measure of SLOC and will be collecting evidence for its validity using a multiwave survey design. Further, we address a call for research on individual differences that predict safety outcomes beyond organizational climate by examining whether SLOC explains incremental variance in safety behaviors (i.e., safety performance, safety voice) and safety outcomes (i.e., workplace injuries) above and beyond perceptions of safety climate. The SLOC measure and results of this research can be useful for both researchers and practitioners in understanding the role of individual differences in workplace safety.

Safety Promotion in Turbulent Times: Development and Validation of a COVID-19 Safety Climate Scale

Safety Promotion in Turbulent Times: Development and Validation of a COVID-19 Safety Climate Scale

The present study developed and validated a COVID-19 safety climate scale. This study extends the SC literature by incorporating urgent pandemic-related policies, procedures, and practices for the adequate control of COVID-19 and promotion of workplace health and well-being during the pandemic. The newly developed and validated COVID-19 SC scale consists of two levels: Organization-level COVID-19 SC (18 items) refers to the employees? perceptions of the strategies and efforts upstream in an organization; and Group-level COVID-19 SC (11 items) refers to the employees? perceptions of the intermediate support and care from supervisors.

The comparison of psychological and physical well-being using interdisciplinary methods of assessment

The comparison of psychological and physical well-being using interdisciplinary methods of assessment

Two methods of assessing well-being were compared. Psychological well-being was appraised by standardised questionnaires and physical well-being was established by a MAS recording mobility, loads of joints during activity of machining and assembling workers. The analysis of raw data showed some difficulties in comparing it and the results were not fully convergent. In the presented study psychological well-being was on the average level while physical well-being was high. It makes the general well-being hard to establish. However practical implications from this study are comprehensive, and may be useful in many areas in the organisation including HR, H&S and ergonomics.

A Spanish Translation of Zohar and Luria’s Safety Climate Scale  and a Test of Measurement Equivalence

A Spanish Translation of Zohar and Luria’s Safety Climate Scale and a Test of Measurement Equivalence

The purpose of this study is to provide a Spanish-language version of Zohar and Luria?s (Zohar & Luria, 2005) commonly-used safety climate scale using a rigorous translation-back translation process. Given the widespread use of the Spanish language across the globe and that as of 2020, 17.6% percent of the United States working population is Hispanic (BLS, 2021), there is a need for valid safety climate scales written in Spanish. This study demonstrates that a test of measurement equivalency can provide confidence of the translation process from one language to another. There is significant evidence supporting the reliability and validity of this safety climate scale.

Developing and Validating a Respectful Workplace Climate Scale with Construction Workers as Exemplar: A Total Worker Health Approach (Phase I)

Developing and Validating a Respectful Workplace Climate Scale with Construction Workers as Exemplar: A Total Worker Health Approach (Phase I)

Our project aims to develop and validate a Respectful Workplace Climate Scale to support the goal of fostering, promoting, and measuring a respectful workplace culture and climate in the workplace. In order to develop a reliable and valid respectful climate scale, we will utilize a mixed methods approach with both qualitative and quantitative methods. The current study represents Phase I of the project, providing insight on this topic based on the literature review and analysis of 10 SME?s responses. The long-term goal of this project is to help companies build a respectful workplace by developing a psychometrically sound Respectful Workplace Climate Scale that they can use to gauge the status of respect in their workplaces and the progress of interventions implemented.