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Center for Health, Work & Environment: A Center of Excellence for Total Worker Health

Center for Health, Work & Environment: A Center of Excellence for Total Worker Health

The purpose of the Center for Health, Work & Environment (CHWE) Center of Excellence in Total Worker Health (TWH) is to advance the overall safety, health, and well-being of workers through transdisciplinary research, effective interventions, outreach and communications, education/training, and rigorous evaluation that inform improvements in all of the above. CHWE addresses the need for research on Total Worker Health intervention strategies, focusing on the large number of workers and workplaces at highest risk of occupational fatality, injury, and illness. Specifically, CHWE research will build on the team?s experience in creating innovative TWH interventions and practical outreach tools for small businesses, the education industry, and other high-risk sectors such as agriculture.

Uncovering the sources and impacts of fatigue for onshore oil and gas extraction workers

Uncovering the sources and impacts of fatigue for onshore oil and gas extraction workers

To better understand motor vehicle injuries and associated risk factors in the U.S. onshore oil and gas extraction (OGE) industry, NIOSH researchers set out to survey 500 OGE workers. Survey respondents reported extreme daily commutes, long work hours, and limited sleep all of which were significantly associated with risky driving behaviors and poor driving safety outcomes. The NIOSH researchers are initiating a new research study to identify and describe fatigue in this workforce. The goal of this project is to produce baseline estimates of fatigue for onshore OGE workers, develop initial guidance to employers about the types of work tasks, work schedules, and determine operational environments that should be targeted for fatigue-related interventions.

An Expanded Conceptual Model for Research on Work, Safety, Health, and Well-being

An Expanded Conceptual Model for Research on Work, Safety, Health, and Well-being

The Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Center for Work, Health, & Well-being is a NIOSH Total Worker Health? Center of Excellence. Its mission is to protect and promote the safety, health, and well-being of workers through integrated workplace policies, programs, and practices that foster safe and healthy conditions of work. Building on its systems-level conceptual model centered on the conditions of work, the Center has expanded this model to include employment & labor patterns and the social/political/economic environment. The Center?s three unifying themes, informed by our conceptual model, provide a framework for setting priorities to ensure that our research and dissemination efforts make a difference in improving the conditions of work.

Workplace Loneliness as an Explanatory Mechanism in Incivility Outcomes

Workplace Loneliness as an Explanatory Mechanism in Incivility Outcomes

Researchers have studied loneliness as a modern health epidemic leading to myriad negative health effects, yet the literature lacks evidence of loneliness? antecedents and consequences in the context of the workplace. Utilizing samples from state corrections supervisors (Sample 1) and the general working population (Sample 2), we found that loneliness at least partially explains the relationship between incivility and individual mental health (emotional exhaustion, depression, and anxiety) and organizationally relevant (increased turnover intentions, decreased job satisfaction, increased health-related absenteeism, and lower job performance) outcomes, and that workgroup civility norms appear to moderate the relationship between incivility and outcomes. Results of this study point to the importance of future research on workplace loneliness interventions.

New venture launch: The impacts of relationship quality and spousal commitment

New venture launch: The impacts of relationship quality and spousal commitment

The study purpose is to examine individual and relational contributions to an entrepreneur?s perception of their spouse?s commitment to a new business venture one year after its creation. Hobfoll?s Conservation of Resources theory of stress was the theoretical grounding for the study of 73 entrepreneurs and their spouses. Whether a spouse was involved in the new venture prior to its launching, whether the spouse perceived the new venture to be a positive influence on their couple relationship, and an entrepreneur?s positive global affect one year after the launch predicted the entrepreneur?s perception of spousal commitment to the new venture one year after its launch. Spousal involvement had the strongest influence on entrepreneur?s perception of spousal commitment followed by spousal expectation of the business on their couple relationship and entrepreneur?s global affect.

Work, Stress, and Construction Industry’s Health: Pandemic squeeze on already fragile workforce

Work, Stress, and Construction Industry’s Health: Pandemic squeeze on already fragile workforce

The COVID-19 pandemic has worsened the nation?s drug overdose epidemic with both forces significantly impacting the safety, health, and well-being of the construction workforce. Our program is engaged in developing strategies to stem the tide of overdose deaths and help the rising numbers of construction workers suffering from opioid misuse disorder and poor mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings informed a suite of communication and training interventions, communicating the big picture and systemic issues to construction decision-makers who can change conditions for the workforce. We are also reaching out to the people most affected, those who are struggling with mental health and substance misuse disorder.

NIOSH Healthy Work Design and Well-Being Program

NIOSH Healthy Work Design and Well-Being Program

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Healthy Work Design and Well-Being (HWD) National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) Program seeks to improve the design of work, work environments, management practices, and organizational policies in order to advance worker safety, health, and well-being. The HWD Program partners with industry, labor, trade associations, professional organizations, and academia to address HWD needs. This poster describes how the program and its partners address outcomes of interest under the umbrella of safety, health, and well-being including but not limited to traditional injury and illness; depression, anxiety, suicide, PTSD; substance abuse, and cognitive impairment; metabolic disorders, and sleep disorders; and well-being (quality of life, hedonic, and evaluative well-being).

The Healthy Work Survey: Tools and resources designed for use by labor unions and worker advocates in assessing work organization, and evaluating workplace improvements.

The Healthy Work Survey: Tools and resources designed for use by labor unions and worker advocates in assessing work organization, and evaluating workplace improvements.

Labor unions, worker health & safety advocacy group are in a unique position to address the risks of psychosocial work hazards and to implement enforceable work organization improvements. However, many of these efforts go without evaluation by occupational health researchers. We will show how the tools and resources developed by the Healthy Work Campaign, including the online Healthy Work Survey, can be used by labor organizations to better assess harmful work organization/stressors and evaluate improvements they make.

Are Prosocial Job Characteristics For Everyone? The Job Impact Framework, Personality, and Emotional Labor

Are Prosocial Job Characteristics For Everyone? The Job Impact Framework, Personality, and Emotional Labor

This study examined the moderating relationships of prosocial personality, extroversion, and emotional labor on prosocial job characteristics (PSJC) and burnout and work-related negative affect. Extroversion moderated the relationship between PSJC and burnout. Contrary to hypotheses, PSJC were associated with negative affect, and low levels of deep acting buffered the relationship. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to consider detrimental outcomes from the job impact framework.