Showing: 21 - 24 of 24 RESULTS
The Relation of the Occupational Depression Inventory to Commonly Used Measures of Workplace Burnout

The Relation of the Occupational Depression Inventory to Commonly Used Measures of Workplace Burnout

In a study of the relation of the Occupational Depression Inventory (ODI), the first-of-its-kind measure of work-related depression, to the Maslach Burnout Inventory?s (MBI) subscales and the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI), we found that the emotional exhaustion (EE) component of the MBI (in a French schoolteacher sample) and the CBI (in a New Zealand teacher sample) are highly correlated with the ODI (rho and r > .80), higher than the correlations of EE with the other MBI subscales. We also found that individuals who met criteria for the ODI?s algorithmically-generated provisional diagnoses of depression have highly elevated EE and CBI scores. Exploratory structural equation modeling bifactor analyses indicated that the EE, CBI, and ODI items measure the same construct. We underline applications for occupational health specialists of the ODI as a practical replacement of burnout measures.

Meta-analysis of the Burnout-Depression Relationship in Teachers

Meta-analysis of the Burnout-Depression Relationship in Teachers

We conducted a meta-analysis of 11 studies of educators (n = 11,729) that bear on the relationship of the MBI?s subscales, emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and a reduced sense of professional accomplishment (rPA) with each other and with validated depression scales (we expect to add two or three more studies in the coming months). The EE-depression correlation (r = 0.68; disattenuated r = 0.76) was greater than the intercorrelations among the three MBI subscales and the correlations of DP and rPA with depression. The evidence suggests that among educators the tripartite conceptualization of burnout consisting of EE, DP, and rPA does not hold up. An implication of our research is that an educator who is suffering from burnout could be helped by a clinician who specializes in the treatment of depression. We believe this an reduce attrition.

Testing the Benefits of Increases in Perceived Support

Testing the Benefits of Increases in Perceived Support

We investigated whether increases of perceived support (FSS and POS) were beneficial to employee well-being during the initial weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic. Utilizing random-intercepts cross-lagged panel modeling with 3-wave weekly longitudinal survey data, we tested the within-person changes in employee well-being in response to increases in support. We found limited evidence that organizational supports are efficacious in promoting well-being during the pandemic. We suggest that extreme ecological contexts – such as a pandemic or downsizing – may force scholars and managers to reconsider the type of supports needed.

The Unfolding Effects on First Responders in the COVID-19 Pandemic: Safety Climate, Burnout, and Depression

The Unfolding Effects on First Responders in the COVID-19 Pandemic: Safety Climate, Burnout, and Depression

The present study aimed at understanding the challenges to the mental health and safety of fire service-based Emergency Medical Service (EMS) workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, while investigating the role station safety climate. We showed that safety climate can buffer the effect of burnout on depression. Station safety climate is an important organizational resource to safeguard employee safety and health in crisis situations such as the COVID-19 pandemic.