Showing: 1 - 10 of 17 RESULTS
Using workers’ compensation systems to improve workplace safety and health

Using workers’ compensation systems to improve workplace safety and health

The mission of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Center for Workers’ Compensation Studies (CWCS) is to maximize the use of workers’ compensation (WC) claims data and systems to improve workplace safety and health through partnerships. This poster presentation will describe recent and ongoing CWCS surveillance and research studies to achieve several key goals (see https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/workercomp/cwcs/publications.html).

Applying a Healthy Work Design Perspective to Understand Hospitality Employee’s Public Ratings of their Organization

Applying a Healthy Work Design Perspective to Understand Hospitality Employee’s Public Ratings of their Organization

It is important to promote positive quality of work life for employees, particularly in industries with challenges for employee health and safety. The present study uses Indeed.com Work Happiness Scores as an indicator of healthy work design for Central Florida Hotels. Results highlight the importance of promoting positive psychosocial work features for employees through healthy work design.

NIOSH Chronic Disease Prevention Program: Expanding Partnerships to Prevent Occupational Disease

NIOSH Chronic Disease Prevention Program: Expanding Partnerships to Prevent Occupational Disease

This presentation provides information on the mission and function of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health?s (NIOSH?s) Cancer, Reproductive, Cardiovascular and Other Chronic Disease Prevention Program (CRC). The poster will describe current research priorities related to reducing and preventing occupational chronic diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, renal diseases, and neurological diseases as well as adverse reproductive outcomes. Collaboration with researchers, labor unions, professional and trade associations, and others is critical to the CRC and this poster will help to promote partnerships external to NIOSH.

Robotics Safety and Health Research at the NIOSH Center for Occupational Robotics Research

Robotics Safety and Health Research at the NIOSH Center for Occupational Robotics Research

Extensive research has been conducted by NIOSH and others on the safety of robots since they were first introduced to workplaces more than 40 years ago. However, this research focused on traditional robots that were isolated from human workers using guards, cages, or other controls. As robots have become more advanced, interactions with humans have become more common, and new ways of assessing and controlling the hazards associated with a robotic workplace are needed. The Center for Occupational Robotics Research (CORR) was established in 2017 as a virtual center within the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to work in partnership with other federal agencies, academic researchers, employers, and others to conduct research and disseminate guidance on the safety and health concerns of working around robots.

Wearable sensors: benefits and challenges for safety, stress, and health in the workplace

Wearable sensors: benefits and challenges for safety, stress, and health in the workplace

  Emanuele Cauda, PhD, NIOSH; John Snawder, PhD, NIOSH; Pramod Kulkarni, PhD, NIOSH Wearable sensor technologies (wearables) are a topic of great interest for the NIOSH Center for Direct Reading and Sensor Technologies (CDRST). The CDRST is one of the NIOSH National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA)Core and Specialty Programs. Wearables are used in several applications …

E-Mail as a Source of Stress and Burnout Symptoms: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Conflict

E-Mail as a Source of Stress and Burnout Symptoms: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Conflict

Despite some findings that e-mail use can lead to symptoms of burnout and the experience of work-family conflict, no studies have addressed the relationship between e-mail as a source of stress and both burnout symptoms and work-family conflict. Additionally, no previous research has tested the mediation effect of work-family conflict in the relationship between e-mail as a source of stress and burnout symptoms. We conducted a cross-sectional study, in which 389 employees from a multinational company responded to an online survey. Our results provide evidence to consider that e-mail as a source of stress is likely to cause a conflict between an individual?s work and family domains, which by its turn, will lead to the experience of burnout symptoms.

Does psychological capital moderate the effect of adverse childhood experiences on subjective well-being and job burnout? A moderated mediation model

Does psychological capital moderate the effect of adverse childhood experiences on subjective well-being and job burnout? A moderated mediation model

This study investigates the role of psychological capital as a buffer of the effect of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) on subjective well-being and job burnout. We used a sample of 359 workers from a public organization in Puerto Rico to test the effect of ACE on job burnout through subjective wellbeing and to examine the moderating role of psychological capital in this indirect effect. Results showed that ACE have a negative effect on job burnout through subjective well-being. The conditional process analysis showed a significant moderated mediation in which the effect of ACE on burnout via subjective well-being is not significant at higher levels of psychological capital. This study provides empirical evidence for the potential of psychological capital interventions to mitigate the effect of ACE on subjective and work-related well-being.

Too stressed to de-stress? The experience of work stress among legal professionals

Too stressed to de-stress? The experience of work stress among legal professionals

Using a mixed-methods approach, our study examined views of stress and recovery among a sample of attorneys. In open-ended data, attorneys commonly expressed that their job is very demanding and it impacts their health. Quantitative findings added that stressors and attitudes toward stress (comparing ones stress to another, feeling guilt for taking time for breaks) all are associated poor recovery experiences. Our findings suggest that practical interventions to support the health and well-being of legal professionals (and likely many other high-stress occupations) may need to first target attitudes and beliefs about the normalness of high stress and insufficient recovery.

Interventions targeting health and wellbeing among nail salon workers: A scoping review

Interventions targeting health and wellbeing among nail salon workers: A scoping review

We propose to present our scoping review of interventions targeting the health and wellbeing of nail salon workers. We used a five-step approach to retrieve, review, and appraise peer-reviewed articles. Four unique interventions were identified indicating the need for more rigorous interventions to promote the health and wellbeing of nail salon workers.