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The price of pain: Pain as an explanatory mechanism for the relationship between physical job demands and intentions to turnover

The price of pain: Pain as an explanatory mechanism for the relationship between physical job demands and intentions to turnover

Our presentation conceptualizes pain as an explanatory mechanism for the relationship between physical job demands and intentions to turnover (ITO), using the fear-avoidance (FA) model as the theoretical framework. Data from a multi-wave study on work capacity and aging, which included 360 participants recruited from five manufacturing organizations in the northeastern U.S., were analyzed using the SPSS PROCESS macro (model 4) to estimate direct and indirect effects, while controlling for various covariates. Our results indicated that high physical job demands were significantly related to increased perceptions of pain; high perceptions of pain and high physical job demands were significantly related to higher ITO; and the relationship between physical job demands and ITO was partially mediated by perceptions of pain. Collectively, these results indicate that ITO is a potential outcome of physical job demands, and that pain may partially explain this relationship. As such, in order to reduce instances of ITO, research as well as organizations that require employees to engage in physically demanding work should focus on uncovering interventions that may reduce an employee?s associated experience of pain.

Changes in Job Demands and Resources for Fire-Based First Responders due to COVID-19

Changes in Job Demands and Resources for Fire-Based First Responders due to COVID-19

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. fire service personnel have reported increased physical and mental demands. The purpose of this study is to dive deeper into the experiences of the US fire service and examine these demands and identify resources to mitigate imbalance. Semi-structured interviews with fifteen US fire departments illuminated additional job demands and potential resources in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Although preliminary findings indicate more discussion surrounding resources compared to demands, further analysis is needed to identify key themes in the data.

Job Insecurity and the Moderating Role of Economic Dependence and Job Satisfaction: What Happens When You Really Need or Love Your Job?

Job Insecurity and the Moderating Role of Economic Dependence and Job Satisfaction: What Happens When You Really Need or Love Your Job?

Researchers have consistently found that job insecurity is related to a number of poor health and well-being outcomes. Despite this, the extent to which this relationship may be moderated by job satisfaction or financial dependence on the job has not been sufficiently investigated. Our study found support for the moderating role of economic dependence and job satisfaction in the relationship between job insecurity and life satisfaction. In addition, we also found that economic dependence moderates the relationship between job insecurity and self-rated health.

Traversing the cacophonous office jungle: Investigating the effects of office type and organizational practices for autistic employees.

Traversing the cacophonous office jungle: Investigating the effects of office type and organizational practices for autistic employees.

Informed by person-environment fit theory, this cross-sectional study examined the effects of office design (open-plan vs. enclosed offices) and organizational practices (control, voice) on the job attitudes and well-being of 100 autistic employees. Results indicated that distractions were higher and environmental satisfaction, affective commitment were lower for autistic employees in an open plan office setting than those in enclosed office spaces. Perceived control and voice had significant relationships with attitudinal and well-being outcomes. The practical implications for employers include giving autistic employees the ability to reduce open-plan obstacles in ways they see fit, while also championing organizational practices to increase fit.

Worker commitment to addressing burnout pre and post COVID-19.

Worker commitment to addressing burnout pre and post COVID-19.

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, a multi-union, joint labor-management team of mental health staff prioritized burnout at their public-sector worksite. A comprehensive set of interventions to address root causes was in its implementation phase when the global pandemic both interrupted those plans and exacerbated burnout for all healthcare workers. This team is now exploring what changes to their original interventions might be needed to address the massive post-pandemic burnout which they and co-workers are experiencing. They plan to lead a series of focus groups at their facility, to better understand how their colleagues experienced the last year, and what efforts would be meaningful and feasible now.

Impact of Surface Acting Emotional Labor on Depression in Healthcare Workers: The Role of Emotional Exhaustion as a Mediator

Impact of Surface Acting Emotional Labor on Depression in Healthcare Workers: The Role of Emotional Exhaustion as a Mediator

In this study conducted in a mixed population of non-clinical and clinical healthcare staff, we examined the association of depression with preventable work environment factors using a novel mediation analysis approach. We found that emotional labor (SaEL), emotional exhaustion, job strain, and work family interference were positively associated with depression while perceived organizational support for safety and work role functioning were negatively associated. The association between emotional labor and depression was strongly mediated through emotional exhaustion. These findings suggest that interventions regarding SaEL are needed for HCWs in order to reduce emotional exhaustion and consequently decrease the risk of depression. Further longitudinal studies are needed to verify these associations.

Autistic employees’ experiences in the office environment and suggestions for improvement: A qualitative reflexive thematic analysis.

Autistic employees’ experiences in the office environment and suggestions for improvement: A qualitative reflexive thematic analysis.

Informed by person-environment fit theory, this study qualitatively investigated the experiences of autistic employees in the office environment in relation to their well-being and job attitudes. A total of 100 autistic employees of varied industries and countries participated in this survey, and the data were analyzed using reflexive thematic analysis, albeit the analyses are at present incomplete. The themes identified by this study can inform measures employers take to increase autistic employee fit in the office.

How Others Perceive Our Competence Matters: An Examination of Working Cancer Survivors’ Work Engagement and Turnover Intention

How Others Perceive Our Competence Matters: An Examination of Working Cancer Survivors’ Work Engagement and Turnover Intention

Working cancer survivors can face stereotypes and discrimination at work. Our research focused on cancer survivors’ perceptions about whether they are seen as competent or not in the workplace. Survey data from 200 working cancer survivors indicated that when survivors perceived that others at work see them as competent, they developed higher self-efficacy, which was then related to higher work engagement and lower turnover intention. Cancer survivors’ need for emotional support served as a boundary condition.

Examining the Relationship Between Work Demands and Burnout During COVID-19 and the Moderating Effects of Professional Social Support and Psychological Flexibility

Examining the Relationship Between Work Demands and Burnout During COVID-19 and the Moderating Effects of Professional Social Support and Psychological Flexibility

The objective of this study (to be completed by July 2021) is to assess the relationship between work demands and burnout among applied behavior analysis (ABA) practitioners, along with the moderating role of professional social support and psychological flexibility. This study extends previous burnout research within this professional demographic to understand how work demands may have changed for ABA practitioners in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. ABA practitioners are at higher risk of burnout due to characteristics of their work, and workloads for ABA practitioners are expected to be heavier during the COVID-19 pandemic, which may intensify physical and mental exhaustion. The study used a non-experimental design, and a link to a web-based survey was disseminated.

The comparison of psychological and physical well-being using interdisciplinary methods of assessment

The comparison of psychological and physical well-being using interdisciplinary methods of assessment

Two methods of assessing well-being were compared. Psychological well-being was appraised by standardised questionnaires and physical well-being was established by a MAS recording mobility, loads of joints during activity of machining and assembling workers. The analysis of raw data showed some difficulties in comparing it and the results were not fully convergent. In the presented study psychological well-being was on the average level while physical well-being was high. It makes the general well-being hard to establish. However practical implications from this study are comprehensive, and may be useful in many areas in the organisation including HR, H&S and ergonomics.