Showing: 1 - 10 of 37 RESULTS
Using workers’ compensation systems to improve workplace safety and health

Using workers’ compensation systems to improve workplace safety and health

The mission of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Center for Workers’ Compensation Studies (CWCS) is to maximize the use of workers’ compensation (WC) claims data and systems to improve workplace safety and health through partnerships. This poster presentation will describe recent and ongoing CWCS surveillance and research studies to achieve several key goals (see https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/workercomp/cwcs/publications.html).

Uncovering the sources and impacts of fatigue for onshore oil and gas extraction workers

Uncovering the sources and impacts of fatigue for onshore oil and gas extraction workers

To better understand motor vehicle injuries and associated risk factors in the U.S. onshore oil and gas extraction (OGE) industry, NIOSH researchers set out to survey 500 OGE workers. Survey respondents reported extreme daily commutes, long work hours, and limited sleep all of which were significantly associated with risky driving behaviors and poor driving safety outcomes. The NIOSH researchers are initiating a new research study to identify and describe fatigue in this workforce. The goal of this project is to produce baseline estimates of fatigue for onshore OGE workers, develop initial guidance to employers about the types of work tasks, work schedules, and determine operational environments that should be targeted for fatigue-related interventions.

Acute pesticide poisonings in the United States remain as a source of concern

Acute pesticide poisonings in the United States remain as a source of concern

Acute pesticide poisonings in the United States are still of concern as these are preventable. Prevention efforts need to be targeted at persons who apply pesticides, those who conduct routine work activities not involving pesticide application, and those persons who were exposed while performing routine indoor activities not involving pesticide application.

Working on the railroad during COVID-19: A case study analysis on employee perceptions of safety culture

Working on the railroad during COVID-19: A case study analysis on employee perceptions of safety culture

This mixed-methods case study analysis investigates employees? perceptions of their organization?s COVID-19 response, and seeks to examine how these perceptions relate to the organization?s safety culture. Qualitative and quantitative archival survey data collected from one large freight-carrying railroad with sites across the U.S. was utilized to conduct analyses. The top five themes extracted from a bottom-up qualitative analysis of employees? open-ended responses about their organization?s COVID-19 response are presented and discussed (n = 196). Initial quantitative analyses that examine these responses in relation to employees? perceptions of their organization?s safety culture suggest that an organization?s existing safety culture may relate to its handling of the pandemic; a finding that bolsters existing literature on the many benefits of a strong organizational safety culture. Additional analyses are currently being conducted to further explore how the top five themes that emerged from open-ended comments relate to more-specific indicators of safety culture. In this way, we may be able to more finely-tune the practical implications of this work.

Stigma and sources of help-seeking for mental health challenges among firefighters

Stigma and sources of help-seeking for mental health challenges among firefighters

The purpose of the current study was to investigate how stigma related to sources of help-seeking among firefighters. Over 2,000 firefighters across the United States and Canada completed an anonymous online survey including questions about stigma regarding mental health care and sources of help-seeking. Firefighters who reported stigma would prevent them from using behavioral health services were less likely to report that they would seek help from Department or Union EAP/MAP services, coworkers, and officers.

NIOSH Chronic Disease Prevention Program: Expanding Partnerships to Prevent Occupational Disease

NIOSH Chronic Disease Prevention Program: Expanding Partnerships to Prevent Occupational Disease

This presentation provides information on the mission and function of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health?s (NIOSH?s) Cancer, Reproductive, Cardiovascular and Other Chronic Disease Prevention Program (CRC). The poster will describe current research priorities related to reducing and preventing occupational chronic diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, renal diseases, and neurological diseases as well as adverse reproductive outcomes. Collaboration with researchers, labor unions, professional and trade associations, and others is critical to the CRC and this poster will help to promote partnerships external to NIOSH.

Work, Stress, and Construction Industry’s Health: Pandemic squeeze on already fragile workforce

Work, Stress, and Construction Industry’s Health: Pandemic squeeze on already fragile workforce

The COVID-19 pandemic has worsened the nation?s drug overdose epidemic with both forces significantly impacting the safety, health, and well-being of the construction workforce. Our program is engaged in developing strategies to stem the tide of overdose deaths and help the rising numbers of construction workers suffering from opioid misuse disorder and poor mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings informed a suite of communication and training interventions, communicating the big picture and systemic issues to construction decision-makers who can change conditions for the workforce. We are also reaching out to the people most affected, those who are struggling with mental health and substance misuse disorder.

NIOSH Center for Maritime Safety and Health Studies

NIOSH Center for Maritime Safety and Health Studies

Industries and occupations that are the focus of the Center for Maritime Safety and Health Studies specialty program include shipyards, marine terminals, marine transportation, commercial fishing, aquaculture, seafood processing and commercial diving. Maritime workers are engaged in highly varied and diverse work settings and are exposed to a complex mixture of health hazards. Stress and its adverse short-term and long-term safety and health consequences are known to occur in many maritime industries and occupations, but it is not well recognized or characterized, nor adequately researched or addressed. The objective of this presentation is to highlight occupations and industries within the Maritime Specialty program where exposure to fatigue and stress are of concern.