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Total Worker Health Participatory Action Research to Impact Health of Workers in Precarious Jobs

Total Worker Health Participatory Action Research to Impact Health of Workers in Precarious Jobs

The University of Illinois Chicago Center for Healthy Work (CHW) is a NIOSH-funded Center for Excellence for Total Worker Health? (TWH) that implements participatory action research by engaging communities to understand how precarious work impacts residents, building the skills of public health and labor to collaboratively identify pathways to healthy work, and working with local leaders to leverage resources to implement TWH initiatives. The CHW utilizes PAR through the Greater Lawndale Healthy Work project and Healthy Communities through Healthy Work to embrace social justice and health equity as a research orientation that is better suited to addressing complex health issues, like precarious work and OSH disparities, through TWH.

Quantifying Sick Leave Among Those Who Work Primarily Outside of the Home During 2020

Quantifying Sick Leave Among Those Who Work Primarily Outside of the Home During 2020

The 2020 Summer and Fall Styles surveys asked whether currently employed adult respondents who reported working outside the home were able to take sick leave from work. We measured sick leave availability among respondents working outside the home in both surveys by total population and the subset of those diagnosed with COVID-19. Between Summer and Fall 2020, the proportion of people working outside of the home with access to paid sick leave decreased significantly.

Toward understanding how menopausal symptoms affects work-related stress. A cross-sectional study in a sample of women, administrative employees.

Toward understanding how menopausal symptoms affects work-related stress. A cross-sectional study in a sample of women, administrative employees.

The increasing presence of employed women undergoing menopause has stimulated a growing corpus of research highlighting the complex relationship between menopause and work. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the mechanism by which menopause affects work ability and work-related well-being. In order to fill this gap in the literature, the present study examined whether and how menopausal symptoms affect the relationship between job demands, work ability, and exhaustion. In total, 1,069 menopausal women employed as administrative officers in a public organization filled out a self-report questionnaire. A moderated mediation analysis was carried out using latent moderated structural (LMS) equation. The findings of this analysis indicated that the indirect effect of work ability on the relationship between job demands and exhaustion is influenced by the exacerbating effect of menopausal symptoms on the relationship between job demands and work ability. Moreover, the conditional effect confirmed that women with high menopausal symptoms receive more exposure to the negative effects of job demands on work ability compared to women with low menopausal symptoms. The present findings may help in addressing interventions to prevent negative outcomes for menopausal women and their organizations.

Work, Stress, and Construction Industry’s Health: Pandemic squeeze on already fragile workforce

Work, Stress, and Construction Industry’s Health: Pandemic squeeze on already fragile workforce

The COVID-19 pandemic has worsened the nation?s drug overdose epidemic with both forces significantly impacting the safety, health, and well-being of the construction workforce. Our program is engaged in developing strategies to stem the tide of overdose deaths and help the rising numbers of construction workers suffering from opioid misuse disorder and poor mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings informed a suite of communication and training interventions, communicating the big picture and systemic issues to construction decision-makers who can change conditions for the workforce. We are also reaching out to the people most affected, those who are struggling with mental health and substance misuse disorder.

Robotics Safety and Health Research at the NIOSH Center for Occupational Robotics Research

Robotics Safety and Health Research at the NIOSH Center for Occupational Robotics Research

Extensive research has been conducted by NIOSH and others on the safety of robots since they were first introduced to workplaces more than 40 years ago. However, this research focused on traditional robots that were isolated from human workers using guards, cages, or other controls. As robots have become more advanced, interactions with humans have become more common, and new ways of assessing and controlling the hazards associated with a robotic workplace are needed. The Center for Occupational Robotics Research (CORR) was established in 2017 as a virtual center within the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to work in partnership with other federal agencies, academic researchers, employers, and others to conduct research and disseminate guidance on the safety and health concerns of working around robots.

Understanding Job Demands and Organizational Resources Needed During COVID-19: An Analysis of Attending Physicians and Registered Nurses

Understanding Job Demands and Organizational Resources Needed During COVID-19: An Analysis of Attending Physicians and Registered Nurses

Our research seeks to develop a deeper understanding of the specific job demands and resources needed for attendings and registered nurses during times of crisis. This research will bridge an important gap in the hospital industry?s ability to assist their employees, as nurses are a historically underrepresented group (French et al., 2002; Liu et al., 2018). Preliminary analyses have identified several job demands that are shared across clinicians, including but not limited to a shortage of staff, schedule issues, high patient volume and acuity, and bed holds.

Job Insecurity and the Moderating Role of Economic Dependence and Job Satisfaction: What Happens When You Really Need or Love Your Job?

Job Insecurity and the Moderating Role of Economic Dependence and Job Satisfaction: What Happens When You Really Need or Love Your Job?

Researchers have consistently found that job insecurity is related to a number of poor health and well-being outcomes. Despite this, the extent to which this relationship may be moderated by job satisfaction or financial dependence on the job has not been sufficiently investigated. Our study found support for the moderating role of economic dependence and job satisfaction in the relationship between job insecurity and life satisfaction. In addition, we also found that economic dependence moderates the relationship between job insecurity and self-rated health.